News

Flu

Date: 24 October 2018

FLU

Flu occurs every year, usually in the winter, which is why it’s sometimes called seasonal flu. It’s a highly infectious disease with symptoms that come on very quickly. Colds are much less serious and usually start gradually with a stuffy or runny nose and a sore throat. A bad bout of flu can be much worse than a heavy cold.

You can catch flu all year round, but it’s especially common in winter. It’s not the same as the common cold. Flu is caused by a different group of viruses and the symptoms tend to start more suddenly, be more severe and last longer.

The most common symptoms of flu are fever, chills, headache, aches and pains in the joints and muscles, and extreme tiredness. Healthy individuals usually recover within two to seven days, but for some the disease can lead to hospitalisation, permanent disability or even death.

For more information on how to stay well this winter visit www.nhs.uk/staywell

The flu vaccine

Flu can affect anyone but if you have a long-term health condition or aged 65 or over the effects of flu can make it worse even if the condition is well managed and you normally feel well.

A flu vaccine is available for free on the NHS for:

  • Anyone aged 65 or over
  • Anyone with a long term condition such as a heart, chest or spleen problem, kidney or liver disease, a neurological condition or diabetes
  • Pregnant women
  • Anyone with a weakened immune system
  • Carers of an older or disabled person
  • Household contacts of an immunocompromised person

Getting your flu jab

An annual flu vaccine nasal spray is also offered to healthy children aged two and three, and to children in reception class and school years one, two, three, four and five.

Get your flu jab as soon as possible to protect yourself over the winter period. If you think you are eligible, contact your GP practice or alternatively ask your local pharmacist.

You should have the flu vaccination every year so you stay protected, as the flu virus can change from year to year.

  • Summary:

    Flu occurs every year, usually in the winter, which is why it’s sometimes called seasonal flu. It’s a highly infectious disease with symptoms that come on very quickly. Colds are much less serious and usually start gradually with a stuffy or runny nose and a sore throat. A bad bout of flu can be much worse than a heavy cold.

     

NHS Bromley CCG, Beckenham Beacon, 379 Croydon Road, Beckenham, BR3 3QL

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